CARD POSTAL FLIP IMAGE – PAST AND PRESENT
P.12 Olympia
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The Philippeion, 336 BC. Philip II of Macedonia constructed this circular temple where Zeus and Hera were worshipped. There were 18 Ionic pillars on the outside and 9 small Corinthian pillars inside.
  P.13 Olympia
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The temple of Zeus, 5th century BC. The temple was 64,12m long and 20m high, with 6 Doric pillars on each short side and 13 on each long one. Inside the temple stood an enormous statue of Zeus made by Phidias, decorated with ivory and gold. This was regarded as one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The bearded Zeus sits on his throne with a sceptre in one had with an eagle on top and a sphere in the other.
P.14 Olympia
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Reconstruction of the Temple of Hera. Built in the 7th century BC. Initially, the temple’s dimensions were 40m x 10m, and new sections were added later. The temple’s first columns were made of wood. They were then replaced by stone columns. Even today visitors are able to see the differences in size and style among the columns that have been preserved.
 P.15 Olympia
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The Nymphaeum of Herod Atticus, 150 AD. Herod Atticus dedicated this building to his wife, Regilla. Pillars surround the large semicircular pool with statues of Zeus and the imperial family in the niches between.
  P.16 Athens
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Sounion, the Temple of Poseidon, 5th century BC. It was a large Doric temple dedicated to the god of the sea, built on a headland on the coast of Attica first seen by travellers arriving across the Aegean Sea. The temple had 6 pillars on each of its smaller sides and 13 on each of the larger. Only 15 pillars have been preserved to this day.
P.17 Athens
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Theatre of Dionysus. In the 4th century BC the theatre was given its characteristic convex form with 64 rows of seats and 13 small staircases. It is estimated to have held up to 17,000 spectators.
P.18 Epidaurus
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The Theatre, 4th century BC. This is the most beautiful theatre in Greece, built with aesthetic harmony and perfect acoustics. In the centre of the circular orchestra was the Dionysus altar. The stage construction was decorated with 12 Ionic columns and two projecting wings. Fifty five rows of seats held 20,200 spectators.
P.19 Athens
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The Agora. Reconstruction of the south side, with Agrippa’s Odeion. The Stoa of Attalos. From 600 BC, the Agora was the centre of Athenian public life. The East Stoa was built by King Attalos of Pergamos in the 2nd century BC and is characteristic of the Agora. It is 116,5m long, 19,4m wide and is decorated with Doric, Ionic and Corinthian columns. The Odeion, a magnificent building with consecutive double rows of covered columns, was built by Agrippas in 15 BC.
P.20 Epidaurus
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The Tholos, 350 BC. It was a circular building with 26 Doric pillars on the outside, 14 Corinthian inside and a conical roof. It was probably associated with the cult of Asclepius. The priest went down a narrow spiral corridor, symbolising descent into the depths of the earth, to obtain the oracles from the god.
P.21 Delphi
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The Temple of Apollo, 7th century BC. It is a peripteral Doric temple (60,32m X 23,82m) with 6 pillars on the short sides and 15 on the long ones. It was rebuilt in the late 4th century BC after a fire. No one was allowed to enter the most sacred area in the middle because it contained the “omphalos” which was thought to be the centre of the world.
P.22 Athens
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The Parthenon, Phidias’ brass statue of Athena, 7,50m high, 5th century BC. The reflection of sunlight on the statue could be seen by sailors reaching the port of Piraeus.

 

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